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Tag Archives: comedy

One for all, and all for one!

To view The Three Musketeers click here. To view The Four Musketeers click here. Director Richard Lester was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania but he directed some of the best British films of the 1960s. Inspired by Buster Keaton and Jacques Tati, he developed an acute funny bone and an appreciation of the absurd that allowed […]

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Summer Daze: Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday (1953)

To view Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday click here. The first screen appearance of Jacques Tati’s Hulot character is inside of a car: a clattering, jittering wreck making its way to a seaside hotel in Monsieur Hulot’s Holiday (1953). Tati cuts from the sound of a train horn to the pitter-putter of Hulot’s gasping car engine as it turns the corner […]

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A Modern Screwball Comedy: The In-Laws (’79)

To view The In-Lawsclick here. Weddings can be stressful. The planning the actual event, along with facing the responsibilities surrounding making a life-long commitment to another person, creates both an exciting and terrifying experience for the couple. But all of the nonsense of the wedding can’t compare to the stress of the couple’s parents meeting […]

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Let’s Go Slumming with Ugly, Dirty and Bad (1976)

To view Ugly, Dirty and Bad click here. Of the major names in the film world who passed away in 2016, one that got overlooked a bit, at least among Americans, was Ettore Scola. A tricky guy to pin down over the course of his career, Scola was largely regarded as a comedy director but […]

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The Postman: Jour de Fete (1949)

To view Jour de fête click here. After a decade-long career as a music-hall performer, Jacques Tati transitioned to feature filmmaking with  a comedy about a remarkably gullible postman. Before Tati invented the iconic bumbling bourgeois Hulot (in M. Hulot’s Holiday, 1953), he experimented with a clumsy working class letter carrier, prone to insecure bouts of drinking and falling flat on his […]

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More Than a Two-Word Review: This is Spinal Tap (’84)

  To view This is Spinal Tap click here. I can’t quite remember exactly when I first saw This is Spinal Tap (1984), but I do know it was sometime in the late 80’s. It was in fairly heavy rotation on cable in various edited forms, and the first few times I only saw bits and pieces—usually […]

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Another Day in the Country: Picnic on the Grass (1959)

To view Picnic on the Grass, click here. For Jean Renoir Picnic on the Grass was both a return and a departure. It was filmed in and around the country estate of Les Collettes, his late father’s land, where he had grown up as a child. It is the perfect setting for this back-to-nature comedy in which a scientist […]

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Ralph Barton and Charlie Chaplin in the Jazz Age

Charlie Chaplin—an icon of cinema—flirted with the fine arts. He sketched on occasion, and he could converse about art and music in social situations, but his strongest connection to the world of art was his friendship with illustrator Ralph Barton. During the 1920s, Barton was a highly successful caricaturist and cartoonist, whose work was elevated […]

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